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Courses

Spring 2018

Introduction to major living world religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (NMCCN 1113).


107.001

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Woodward Lecture Hall 101

This course is designed to give an introduction to the basic beliefs, practices, and texts of some of the world’s major religions. The class will begin with an examination of Hinduism, and then move on to Buddhism, and then include a short section on Chinese religion & philosophy. After looking at these “Eastern” religions, we will examine the “Western” religious tradition, starting with Judaism, then looking at Christianity, and finally Islam.

  • Type: Lecture

107.002

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel
Time/s: M 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 122

This course is designed to give an introduction to the basic beliefs, practices, and texts of some of the world’s major religions. The class will begin with an examination of Hinduism, and then move on to Buddhism, and then include a short section on Chinese religion & philosophy. After looking at these “Eastern” religions, we will examine the “Western” religious tradition, starting with Judaism, then looking at Christianity, and finally Islam.

  • Type: Lecture

107.004

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

This course is an introduction to some of the world's major religions. The class will begin with a study of North American indigenous religions and then it will explore the “Eastern” religions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism.  The second half of the course will cover the “Western” or Abrahamic religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. By the end of the course, students will be able to describe the basic history, teachings, and practices of each religion covered.

107.005

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel
Online Class

107.006

Instructor: Candelaria, Michael
Online Class

This course is an introduction to the academic study of religion, focusing on Hinduism, Buddhism, the Chinese Religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Attention will also be given to oral/indigenous religions and the theories of religion.

 

Pentateuch and the historical books of the Old Testament. {Fall}


230.001

Instructor: Todd, Judith
Online Class

This course introduces the history of ancient Israel through the literature contained in the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament.  The examination places Israel as a religion, as a culture, and as a nation into the context of the Ancient Near East (ANE).  The literature of ancient Israel is explored along with the interactions with other cultures, and through comparative literature, sociology, and religions.

New Testament and early Christian history.


232.001

Instructor: Gorton, Luke
Time/s: MWF 1:00 PM - 1:50 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 211

  • Type: Lecture

A study of major Asian traditions, such as Taoism, Hinduism and Buddhism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (NMCCN 1213). {Fall}


263.001

Instructor: Ulrich, Katherine
Time/s: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 128

Eastern Religions is a thematic introduction to the religions of India, China, Tibet, and Japan and their study in the context of a nonsectarian learning curriculum. Each week we will explore one of Asia’s major indigenous religious traditions and the beliefs and practices of its adherents while examining two broad themes. The first is illness and death: we will explore how beliefs about human bodies, souls, and the afterlife shape medical decisions and funerary practices. The second broad theme for the course is that of pilgrimage and sacred space. How do religious beliefs and practices shape people’s understandings of and interactions with the environment around them? Why do people go on pilgrimage, and what impact do such journeys have on both the people and the places? Religious traditions covered include Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, and the folk, popular, or new religions of India, China, Tibet, and Japan. Classes consist of a combination of powerpoint lectures, films, and the occasional group exercise.

  • Type: Lecture

263.004

Instructor: Shetiya, Vibha
Online Class

V. Shetiya

A brief overview of Eastern Religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism and Shinto.

A study of major Western traditions, such as Christianity, Islam and Judaism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (NMCCN 1223). {Spring}


264.001

Instructor: Lipka, Hilary
Time/s: MWF 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Location: Mitchell Hall 220

H. Lipka

In this class we will focus on the three major religions of the western world: Judaism, Christianity and Islam, tracing the development of each of these religions from their origins up through modern times, and familiarizing ourselves with the major texts, movements, practices, and essential beliefs of each. By the end of this class, students should have a firm grasp of the origins, development, fundamental ideas, beliefs, rituals and practices of these three religions, and develop a sense of what each of these religions mean for the people who practice them and live by them.

  • Type: Lecture

264.003

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Online Class

D. Ray

In this class we will study the three major religions of the Western world—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—tracing the development of these religions from their origins up through modern times, and familiarizing ourselves with the major texts, movements, beliefs, and practices of each.  The goal of the class is not only to establish a firm base of knowledge about these traditions, but also to develop a sense of what they mean for the people who live by them.

An examination of the social, political, and cultural aspects of fundamentalism in the contemporary Muslim world.


313.001

Instructor: Banihashemi, Mozafar
Time/s: TR 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 126

 Banihashemi

This course introduces students to the social, political, and cultural study of Islamic fundamentalism. The content of the course is directed toward understanding the relation between socio/political life and fundamentalist trend in the Muslim world. The course focuses on the cultural, historical, and political developments in Muslim societies that led to the resurgence and decline of fundamentalist trend in the contemporary Islamic world. In this connection, various themes such as modernity, tradition, fundamentalism, conservatism, orthodoxy and orthopraxy, and Islamic theory of state among many others will be discussed. Furthermore, the course will comparatively address the Sunni and Shi’ite fundamentalism including recent developments in Iraq and Syria and the rise of ISIS, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

  • Type: Lecture

An introduction to the origin and development of mystical aspects of Islam, commonly known as Sufism. The course examines themes such as Sufism vis-à-vis Islamic orthodoxy, mystical experience, the literary heritage of Sufism, Sufi organizations.


314.001

Instructor: Banihashemi, Mozafar
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Collaborative Teaching & Learn 210

Banihashemi

This course will introduce students to mystical dimensions of the Islamic religious tradition, commonly known as Sufism. The course will explore the nature, origins, and development of thoughts and practices of mystical Islam.  In this connection, various themes such as Sufism vis-à-vis Islamic orthodoxy, mystical experience of Sufis, internal and external forms of knowledge, the literary heritage of Sufism with an emphasis on Sufi poetry among many others will be reviewed.  The course will also examine Sufi organizations and social practices in the contemporary world.

  • Type: Lecture

This course engages in the close study of biblical texts that address sexual behavior and sexuality, considering how these texts were likely understood in their original context and the different ways they are interpreted today.


322.001

Instructor: Lipka, Hilary
Time/s: T 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 128

T: Sexuality and the Bible

What does the Bible really say about sex and sexuality? The answer is not as simple as one might think. In fact, the Bible has many things to say about sex and sexuality, but the message is not always consistent, and is sometimes open to more than one interpretation. In this class we will consider what both the Old Testament and the New Testament say regarding various aspects of sexual behavior and sexuality, taking into account the original context of these texts, and what they meant to their original audiences. We will also consider how these texts have been historically interpreted, the different ways they are interpreted today, and the impact these interpretations have had on contemporary debates on matters related to sexual behavior and sexuality, such as same-sex marriage, gender roles, and birth control.

  • Type: Lecture

(Also offered as HIST 327/527) The development of Christianity from the Protestant Reformation to the modern day, with focus on the variety of forms Christianity assumed throughout this period as it moved outward from Europe and became a world religion.


327.001

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Economics 1002

This course covers the development of Christianity from the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century to the modern day.  Primary focus will be on the rich variety of forms—doctrinal, liturgical, artistic, intellectual, and institutional—that Christianity assumed throughout this period as it moved outward from Europe and became a world religion.  Also of concern will be the interaction of Christianity with society at large

  • Type: Lecture

This course takes saints as an entry point for exploring North American Catholic history. We focus on the practices by which ordinary Catholics make men and women into saints after their deaths.


343.001

Instructor: Holscher, Kathleen
Time/s: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 129

Saints—men and women who, after their deaths, are celebrated as special and powerful intercessory agents-- have been a part of Christian devotional life for nearly two millennia. When Spanish and French Catholics arrived in the New World, they brought their devotions to saints with them. Over the centuries since then, Catholics of Indigenous, European, and African origins have developed their own devotions that, while informed by European tradition, are also marked by cultural patterns and hardships particular to life in North America. This course takes saints, and the transnational communities that have grown around them, as an entry point for exploring public and private histories of North American Catholicism. Our focus here is not the lives of saints, but rather their “afterlives”— the ways in which their memories have been constructed and reconstructed by lay Catholics, and the ways in which the Church has intervened to mediate those memories, by granting-- or in some cases refusing-- them official recognition. Saints shed light both on public histories of Catholicism—including the part the Church has played in European colonialism, and its relation to the  the ambitions of the U.S. nation-state—and they also speak to ways in which the divine becomes an intimate actor in people's lives.

  • Type: Lecture

Studies in major religious figures or movements. Topic varies.


347.001 T: Goddesses & Gods of India

Instructor: Ulrich, Katherine
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 126

T: Goddesses & Gods of India

K. Ulrich

This course is an introduction to the goddesses and gods of India and explores three questions: 1. Who are the goddesses and gods of India? 2. What are their relationships with each other, male and female human beings, the natural world, and their social and religious contexts? 3. What difference, if any, does the gender of a deity make (e.g., to their relationship with worshipers or to the social structure of the society worshiping them)?

In the course of exploring these questions, we will familiarize ourselves with many local, regional, and pan-Indian gods and goddesses, along with their art/iconography, rituals, philosophy, history, and literature (both Sanskrit and popular). While the focus will be on Hindu goddesses and gods, we will also briefly consider non-Hindu (e.g., Christian, Muslim) saints, who often resemble or act like Hindu deities. Materials for this course are drawn from textual, historical, and ethnographic studies from the various regions of India and the Indian diaspora; classes will be a combination of discussion, powerpoint lectures, and films

  • Type: Topics

347.002 T: New Religions

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Time/s: TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 208

 T: New Religions

 
Throughout its history, America has been fertile soil for religious innovation.  From Native American renewalist movements to Mormons, Rastafarians, Scientologists, and New Age groups, many entrepreneurial religious organizations have emerged and found success in the last two hundred years.  In this course, we will examine, compare, and seek to understand these new religious movements in broader religious and historical context.
  • Type: Topics

347.003 T: Mod Jewish Hist Since 1492

Instructor: Pugach, Noel
Time/s: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Location: Univ Advise & Enrich Center B90

  • Type: Topics

347.004 T: Relg Leaders & Soc Justice

Instructor: ,

347.005 T: Integr Ecol &Soc Transform

Instructor: Banerjee, Subhankar
Time/s: F 9:00 AM - 11:45 AM
Location: Art 304C

  • Type: Topics

347.006 T: Relg Leaders & Soc Justice

Instructor: ,

This course explores issues of social justice through the lives, writings, speeches or sermons of diverse activists from various religious traditions, including Mahatma Gandhi; Dorothy Day; Martin Luther King, Jr.; Abraham Heschel; Malcolm X; the Dalai Lama; Thich Nhat Hanh; Helen Prejean; and Pope Francis. 

The social teaching and "ethical world views" of the various "Abrahamic Faiths," other so-called "World Religions," and "Indigenous Religions" to which particular leaders belong, are also examined.

  • Canceled by department 1/10/2018.
  • Type: Topics

347.007 T: Magic in Ancient Religion

Instructor: Gorton, Luke
Time/s: TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 122

L. Gorton

This course will examine the reality and the imagination of magic in the ancient world, focusing primarily on the cultures of Greece and Rome but with reference to Jewish and early Christian thought as well. Ancient magic manifested itself in a variety of ritual acts which were described, explained, and caricatured in a fairly large number of texts written in antiquity, and it is by reading these texts that we will come to an understanding of magic in the ancient world. Two questions which will permeate the course are as follows: What is magic? How does ancient magic differ from ancient religion? To answer these questions, we will begin with a brief overview of ancient religion (again, primarily Greco-Roman but with reference to ancient Judaism and Christianity) before continuing on to a full discussion of ancient magic. The very term “magic” originated in ancient Greece, and so we will have occasion to discuss both the terminology and practice of magic in the ancient world.

  • Type: Topics

347.010 T: Curanderismo Part 2

Instructor: Torres, Eliseo
Online Class

An introduction exploring relationships between the literary and religious traditions. {Fall}


350.001

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

K. Van Andel

Religion and literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one’s place it in. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture still often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: “The Nature of the Divine,” “Self and Other,”and “Society and Culture,” the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature related to the three Abrahamic faiths−Judaism, Christianity, and Islam−and uses such to explore each unit’s themes. There are two exams, one short reflection assignment, and weekly reading quizzes and class discussion.

  • Online course visit: http//online.unm.edu/schedule
  • Type: Lecture
  • Fee: $100

350.002

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

Religion and literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one’s place it in. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture still often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: “The Nature of the Divine,” “Self and Other,”and “Society and Culture,” the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature related to the three Abrahamic faiths−Judaism, Christianity, and Islam−and uses such to explore each unit’s themes. There are two exams, one short reflection assignment, and weekly reading quizzes and class discussion.

350.003

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

Religion and literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one’s place it in. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture still often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: “The Nature of the Divine,” “Self and Other,”and “Society and Culture,” the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature related to the three Abrahamic faiths−Judaism, Christianity, and Islam−and uses such to explore each unit’s themes. There are two exams, one short reflection assignment, and weekly reading quizzes and class discussion.

(Also offered as PHIL 365) Philosophic analysis of some major concepts and problems in religion. Prerequisite: one course in Religious Studies or Philosophy.


365.001

Instructor: Candelaria, Michael
Time/s: MWF 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Location: Collaborative Teaching & Learn 210

This course explores the fundamental themes of the philosophy of religion—the nature of a maximally perfect being, the arguments for the existence of God, religious and mystical experience. Of special interest will be the problem of religious language. Is religious language descriptive or non-descriptive? Is religious language meaningful or meaningless? Are religious symbols moral emotive or cognitive? Is religious language poetic-ethical? Our sources will come from modern and contemporary philosophy and from Christian, Judaic, Hindu, and Buddhist sources.

  • Type: Lecture

Major religious figures or movements. Topic varies. Prerequisite: one Religious Studies course.


447.001 Sem: Evolution of Religiosity

Instructor: Watson, Paul
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Mechanical Engineering 214

  • Type: Seminar

447.002 Sem: Evolution of Religiosity

Instructor: Watson, Paul
Online ClassTime/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Online Synchronous 1

  • Required online meeting times.Online Synchronous Course Detail: online.unm.edu
  • Type: Seminar
  • Fee: $100

447.003 Sem: Psychology of Religion

Instructor: Bridgers, Lynn
Time/s: TR 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 318

L. Bridgers

The 1909 conference at Clark University, organized by G. Stanley Hall, brought together three pivotal figures in the psychology of religion -- Sigmund Freud, C. G. Jung and William James.  This course begins with an overview of Gustav Fechner's work, the experimental psychologist who influenced all three figures.  It then explores the contributions of the seminal figures at the Clark conference - the psychology of religion as interpreted by Freud, Jung and James.  Shifting to contemporary understandings of religious experience we will examine more biologically based views, including Jerome Kagan's temperament studies, Judith Lewis Herman's traumatic studies, Lawrence Calhoun and Richard Tedeschi's posttraumatic growth, Victor Frankl's logotherapy, and Andrew Newberg's research in neurotheology.  It concludes with an exploration of the strengths and limitations that psychology brings to our understanding of religion and religious experience and the implications for clinical and pastoral practice.

  • Type: Seminar


452.001

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel
Time/s: R 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Location: Humanities 428

D. Wolne

This course is designed to provide an introduction to and critique of some of the most influential 19th, 20th, and 21st century scientific attempts to explain religion. We will begin by examining the difference between supernaturalist and scientific theories of religion. Then, we will investigate some of the major theoreticians in this subject, by reading primary sources with brief introductions by Daniel Pals. We will also look at some contemporary accounts, examining postmodernist and evolutionary psychology’s perspectives on religion. The goal of the class is to provide a forum where these ideas can be examined and critiqued, with an eye towards discovering how these theories might help shed some light upon (or obscure) the careful investigation of religious phenomena. Some background in comparative world religions (either REL 107 or equivalent) is essential for this course. At the close of the course, we will evaluate the lessons learned, and finish by considering what it might mean to construct our own “mega-theory” of religion, or (possibly) conclude that all of our theorizing is doomed to be impossible/inaccurate, and slink off in intellectual disarray!

  • Type: Lecture

Topics in the literary and historical analysis of Biblical texts. Prerequisite: 230 or 231 or 232.


463.001 Sem: Jesus and the Gospels

Instructor: Yates, Franklin
Time/s: TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 128

This course examines the life and teachings of Jesus as they are contained in the four gospels of the New Testament. A comparison of the gospels with each other and with other Christian and non-Christian writings of the period will be used to show the development of the early Christian community and its place in the first century world.

  • Type: Seminar

Restriction: permission of program chairperson.


497.001

Instructor: Bussanich, John

  • Type: Seminar

497.002

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel

  • Type: Seminar

497.003

Instructor: Yates, Franklin
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.004

Instructor: Gerber, Lisa
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.005

Instructor: Holscher, Kathleen
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.006

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.007

Instructor: Bridgers, Lynn
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.008

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.009

Instructor: Gorton, Luke
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.010

Instructor: Banihashemi, Mozafar
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.011

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.012

Instructor: Lipka, Hilary
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

Tutorial arrangement with a member of the graduate faculty.


551.001

Instructor: Bussanich, John

  • Type: Lecture