Fall 2017 Course Descriptions

NOTE: Some courses have multiple sections. Topics course titles and descriptions are located in the Topics menu. For course information please click on the following links:

103 - Intro to the Bible

103.001

Instructor: Candelaria, M
Time/s: TR 1230-1345
Room: 

In this course we will survey the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and the New Testament. We will examine the historical, cultural, social, geographic, political, and religious backgrounds of each of the thirty nine books of the Old Testament and of the twenty seven books of the New Testament. We will examine how these backgrounds form the books of the Bible. We will study the authorship, date, audience, context, and content of each book. We will trace the origins, the transmission, compilation, the editing, and final edition of each work. We will also explore methods of Biblical interpretation and discuss Biblical theologies.

107 - Living World Religions (multiple sections)

107.001

Instructor: Wolne, D
Time/s: MWF 1200-1250
Room: WOOD-101

This course is designed to give an introduction to the basic beliefs, practices, and texts of some of the world’s major religions. The class will begin with an examination of Hinduism, and then move on to Buddhism, and then include a short section on Chinese religion & philosophy. After looking at these “Eastern” religions, we will examine the “Western” religious tradition, starting with Judaism, then looking at Christianity, and finally Islam.

107.002

Instructor: Wolne, D
Time/s: M 1600-1830
Room: 

This course is designed to give an introduction to the basic beliefs, practices, and texts of some of the world’s major religions. The class will begin with an examination of Hinduism, and then move on to Buddhism, and then include a short section on Chinese religion & philosophy. After looking at these “Eastern” religions, we will examine the “Western” religious tradition, starting with Judaism, then looking at Christianity, and finally Islam.

107.006

Instructor: Candelaria, M
Time/s: Online
Room: 

Internet course please visit http://online.unm.edu

FLAT Fee: $100 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

107.008

Instructor: Van Andel, K
Time/s: Online
Room: 

This course is an introduction to some of the world's major religions. The class will begin with a study of North American indigenous religions and then it will explore the “Eastern” religions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism. The second half of the course will cover the “Western” or Abrahamic religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. By the end of the course, students will be able to describe the basic history, teachings, and practices of each religion covered.

230 - Hebrew Scriptures

230.002

Instructor: Todd, J.
Time/s: Online
Room: 

This course introduces the history of ancient Israel through the literature contained in the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament.  The examination places Israel as a religion, as a culture, and as a nation into the context of the Ancient Near East (ANE).  The literature of ancient Israel is explored along with the interactions with other cultures, and through comparative literature, sociology, and religions.

Internet course please visit http://online.unm.edu

FLAT Fee: $100 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

232 - Christian Scriptures

232.002

Instructor: Yates, F.
Time/s: TR 1400-1515
Room: 

This course studies the Christian Scriptures within the context of the world in which it arose. Through readings from the Christian Scriptures, and by reference to other early Christian literature, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Jewish and Greek sources, the course investigates who the first Christians were-what was distinctive about them and also what they had in common with other religious people of the time.

263 - Eastern Religions (multiple sections)

263.001

Instructor: Ulrich, K.
Time/s: TR 930-1045
Room: 

This course is designed to give an introduction to the basic beliefs, practices, and texts of Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, and Shinto.

263.004

Instructor: Gerber, L.
Time/s: Online 1H
Room: 

This class is a survey of the major religious traditions endogenous to Asia. Primarily, this includes Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Jainism, Sikhism, and Shinto. The history, major doctrines, rituals, important sacred texts, and contemporary developments of these traditions will be covered, giving the student an introduction to the religious cultures of India, China, & Japan.

263.003

Instructor: Shetiya, V.
Time/s: Online
Room: 

A brief overview of Eastern Religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism and Shinto.

264 - Western Religions (multiple sections)

Notes:

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Understand the origins and developments of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
  2. Analyze and critically interpret some of the primary texts of these traditions
  3. Cultivate an appreciation of the uniqueness of the wisdom of the Western Religious traditions
  4. Analyze and explain those religions in terms of their relations to culture and practice

264.001

Instructor: Lipka, H
Time/s: MWF 1000-1050
Room: 

In this class we will focus on the three major religions of the western world: Judaism, Christianity and Islam, tracing the development of each of these religions from their origins up through modern times, and familiarizing ourselves with the major texts, movements, practices, and essential beliefs of each. By the end of this class, students should have a firm grasp of the origins, development, fundamental ideas, beliefs, rituals and practices of these three religions, and develop a sense of what each of these religions mean for the people who practice them and live by them.

264.003

Instructor: Ray, D
Time/s: Online
Room: 

In this class we will study the three major religions of the Western world—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—tracing the development of these religions from their origins up through modern times, and familiarizing ourselves with the major texts, movements, beliefs, and practices of each. The goal of the class is not only to establish a firm base of knowledge about these traditions, but also to develop a sense of what they mean for the people who live by them.

314 - Islamic Mysticism

314.001

Instructor: Banihashemi, M.
Time/s: TR 1100-1215
Room: 

This course will introduce students to mystical dimensions of the Islamic religious tradition, commonly known as Sufism. The course will explore the nature, origins, and development of thoughts and practices of mystical Islam. In this connection, various themes such as Sufism vis-a-vis Islamic orthodoxy, mystical experience of Sufis, internal and external forms of knowledge, the literary heritage of Sufism with an emphasis on Sufi poetry among many others will reviewed. The course will also examine Sufi organizations and social practices in the contemporary world.

326 - Christianity to 1517

326.001

Instructor: Ray, D.
Time/s: TR 1100-1215
Room: MITCH-102

This course covers the history of Christianity from its beginnings in Palestine to the eve of the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century.  This was a period of major growth and development for Christianity, but also a time in which the Church faced significant crises and underwent fundamental changes.  We will see Christianity emerge from early challenges to become the official religion of the Roman Empire and then define many aspects of life during the Middle Ages.  Primary focus will be on the rich variety of forms—doctrinal, liturgical, artistic, intellectual, and institutional—that Christianity assumed throughout this period.  Also of concern will be Christianity’s contributions to Western culture and its significance as a "civilizing" force.

347 - Topics in Religious Studies (multiple courses)

347.001 - Apocalypse in the Ancient World

Instructor: Gorton, L.
Time/s: TR 1100-1215
Room: DSH-120

Apocalypse is a fascinating genre which is famous for its strange images, cryptic messages, and predictions of future events. In Apocalypse in the Ancient World, we will examine the development of the genre of apocalypse, starting in Second Temple Judaism and moving on into early Christianity. After discussing the cultural and literary topoi of the apocalypse, we will read a number of apocalypses, including the two included in the Bible (Daniel and Revelation) as well as other well-known apocalypses such as the Book of Enoch. We will study the symbolism, message, and meaning of each to ascertain what they meant to their original readers and what they might mean today. After tracing the development of the genre through early Christianity, we will conclude the course by examining the ongoing legacy of apocalypticism in our world today.

347.002 - Religion and the Body

Instructor: Wolne, D.
Time/s: TR 930-1045
Room: 

This class will examine conceptions of the body ( its essential nature, its basic strengths and weaknesses) found in a range of major religious traditions. In addition, the class will inquire into the areas of modern neuroscience that are relevant to this discussion. Some themes to be addressed include dietary prescriptions in religion; sexuality (both the suppression of and use of for spiritual advancement); gender and female oppression in religion; psychedelic drugs and their use in religious ritual; and the neuroscience of mystical experience. The focus of the class will be to critically inquire into both traditional religious and modern scientific notions about the body and its role in a range of beliefs and practices.

347.003 - Christ and Culture

Instructor: Candelaria, M.
Time/s: TR 1100-1215
Room: 

This course examines the theme of the role of Christ in culture.  More specifically, we will explore the question: To what extent are representations of Christ in art, film, literature, philosophy, and theology projections of cultural self-understanding. We will explore sociological theories that explain religious symbols, beliefs and practices as sociological phenomena. We will begin by discussing the relation of Jesus to first century Palestine Judaism. In particular, we will focus on the possibility of reconstructing the profile of the historical Jesus and testing that profile against early Christian attempts to mold Jesus according to particular Christian movements. Second we will investigate historical conceptions of Christ from the time of post-apostolic Christianity to our time. Then, we will discuss different ways in which the relationship between religion and culture have been articulated. Christ.  Afterwards, we will explore the diversity of the representations of Christ in American history with special emphasis on the Latino/a Christ.

347.004 - Gender and the Bible

Instructor: Lipka, H.
Time/s: MWF 1200-1250
Room: 

In this class we will explore the construction of gender in biblical texts. Some areas we will address are gender in Genesis 1-3, hegemonic and alternative masculinities, gender instability and subversion of gender performance, the gender of God in biblical texts, transgression of gender norms in biblical law, use of gendered imagery in prophetic texts to denote the relationship between God and Israel, and the impact that the construction of gender in biblical texts has on some debates today over issues such as gender roles and transgender rights 

347.005 - Introduction to Buddhism

Instructor: Ulrich, K.
Time/s: TR 1100-1215
Room: 

This class is a historical survey of Buddhist practices, beliefs, institutions, and figures from the time of the historical Buddha through to the contemporary period. Approximately half the semester will focus on early and Theravada Buddhism through a close study of Buddhist scriptures from the Pali Canon and an examination of archaeological evidence from early India; the rest of the semester considers Mahayana and Vajrayana (Tantric) sects of Buddhism. Readings include both primary sources in translation and scholarly literature; classes are a combination of powerpoint lectures and discussion, with the occasional film.

347.006 - Curandismo Part 1

Instructor: Torres, E.
Time/s: Online
Room: 

347.007 - Political Islam Past & Present

Instructor: Banihashemi, M.
Time/s: TR 1530-1645
Room: 

Through a review of social history of Islam, this course explores the complex and nuanced relationship between state and religion, the political community and the religious community, and the ruler and ruled in the early, medieval, and contemporary Islam. The nature of authority in Islamic political philosophy in various historical episodes, from the formative period to the modern time, will be discussed. By drawing on concrete historical cases in Islam, the course will substantively analyze the patterns of convergence and divergence of the religious and the political in Islamic communal life. Additionally, numerous themes such as differential character of political and religious knowledge and action, theocracy, caesaropapism, textuality and historicism, and constitutionalism among other distinct characteristics of political Islam will be examined.

347.008 - Religion and Gender in the U.S.

Instructor: Bridgers, L.
Time/s: TR 1530-1645
Room: 

This course has three interrelated foci to study the impact of gender on religious beliefs and practices in the context of the contemporary United States, to explore the influence and effect of feminism, women’s studies and gender studies in the academic study of religion, and to assess current gender issues within diverse religious traditions. Readings include both descriptive analytical studies by scholars of religion and theoretical, constructive work by religious thinkers and theologians. Attention is given to both fundamentalist constructions of gender and resistance to gender norms within religious traditions. Traditions explored include Christianity, Judaism, Islam and Native American belief systems.

347.009 - Indian Philosophy

Instructor: Taber, J.
Time/s: TR 1630-1900
Room: 

2H course

350 - Religion and Literature (multiple sections)

350.001

Instructor: Van Andel, K
Time/s: Online
Room: 

Religion and literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one's place it in. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture still often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: "The Nature of the Divine," "Self and Other," and "Society and Culture," the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature related to the three Abrahamic faiths−Judaism, Christianity, and Islam−and uses such to explore each units themes, which are meant to trace the development and experience of the self as it moves from a contemplative, inward gaze outward toward the other and the world.

FLAT Fee: $100 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

350.002

Instructor: Van Andel, K.
Time/s: Online
Room: 

Religion and Literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one's place in it. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture sill often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: "The Nature of the Divine," "Self and Other," and "Society and Culture," the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature about the three Abrahamic faiths-Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and uses such to explore each units themes, which are meant to trace the development and experience of the self as it moves from a contemplative, inward gaze outward toward the other and the world.

FLAT Fee: $100 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

350.003

Instructor: Van Andel, K
Time/s: Online
Room: 

Religion and Literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one's place in it. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture sill often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: "The Nature of the Divine," "Self and Other," and "Society and Culture," the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature about the three Abrahamic faiths-Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and uses such to explore each units themes, which are meant to trace the development and experience of the self as it moves from a contemplative, inward gaze outward toward the other and the world.

FLAT Fee: $100 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

351 - Catholicism in America

351.001

Instructor: Holscher, K.
Time/s: TR 930-1045
Room: 

This course introduces students to the historical development of Roman Catholicism in the United States. Today Catholicism is the nation’s largest Christian denomination. Catholics have lived in New Mexico and other places that make up the present-day United States since the sixteenth century. Beginning in the nineteenth century, the American Catholic population increased dramatically, as territory belonging to Mexico became part of this country, and successive waves of immigrants arrived from Europe and, later, the rest of the world. Over time, American Catholics have developed special ways of living their religious lives. They have turned to their faith to help with the challenges of being an immigrant (or the child or grandchild of immigrants). They have worked to find common ground between a religious identity often rooted in a local parish community on one hand, and a global church with a far-off leader and transnational missionary and devotional circuits, on the other. They have struggled to balance loyalty to their Church, in its different forms, with loyalty to their nation. In doing so, they have faced suspicion from Americans provoked by the strangeness of Catholic ritual, and worried that Catholicism was not democratic enough for American soil. By the mid-twentieth century, as American Catholics became more affluent, and gained social and political influence, their faith both shaped, and was shaped by, American culture in important ways. Students in the course will gain knowledge of historical people, ideas and events-- factors that have made the American Church what it is today. They will come away understanding how religious and national interests interact with one another, and how diverse factors, including migration, poverty, popular culture, and citizenship, intersect with people’s religious lives.

365 - Philosophy of Religion

Notes:

(Also offered as PHIL 365)

Xlst: 46589-PHIL 365 001

Xlst: 50021-POLS 300 005

365.001

Instructor: Oberst, J
Time/s: W 1900-2130
Room: 

Philosophic analysis of some major concepts and problems in religion.

Prerequisite: one course in Religious Studies or Philosophy.

441 - Religion in American History

441.001

Instructor: Ray, D.
Time/s: TR 1400-1515
Room: 

The United States is the most religiously diverse nation in the world, and religion is an integral part of American social, cultural, and political discourse.  In this course, we will look at the ways various Americans have understood and expressed this important aspect of their identity, how American culture as a whole has been shaped by religion, and how Americans have dealt with religious differences historically.  The class will cover the rise and development of American religious movements, from Native American traditions and European colonization to revivalism and revolution (Unit 1); nineteenth-century religious disestablishment and ferment, westward expansion, and the emergence of new religious groups (Unit 2); world war and ideological upheaval in the twentieth century; and modern challenges vis à vis religion in communities, schools, and public institutions (Unit 3).  A variety of media will be used for the course, including music, film, and visual images and objects.  

463 - Jesus & Gospels

Notes:

Topics in the literary and historical analysis of Biblical texts.

Prerequisite: 230 or 231 or 232.

463.001 - Sem: Jesus & Gospels

Instructor: Yates, Franklin
Time/s: TR 1530-1645
Room: 

This course examines the life and teachings of Jesus as they are contained in the four gospels of the New Testament. A comparison of the gospels with each other and with other Christian and non-Christian writings of the period will be used to show the development of the early Christian community and its place in the first century world.