Spring 2017 Course Descriptions

NOTE: For current class schedule information including room locations and times please click on the following links:

103 - Introduction to Bible

103.001 - Intro to the Bible

Instructor: Candelaria, M
Time/s: MWF 1100-1150
Room: MITCH-220

In this course we will survey the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and the New Testament. We will examine the historical, cultural, social, geographic, political, and religious backgrounds of each of the thirty nine books of the Old Testament and of the twenty seven books of the New Testament. We will examine how these backgrounds form the books of the Bible. We will study the authorship, date, audience, context, and content of each book. We will trace the origins, the transmission, compilation, the editing, and final edition of each work. We will also explore methods of Biblical interpretation and discuss Biblical theologies.

107 - Living World Religions

Notes:

Student Learning Outcomes for B.A. in Religious Studies

  • Students can articulate how religious symbols and narratives are interpreted and mobilized to construct meaning in human life, by individuals and by communities – and how this changes over time or across different communities.
  • Students can engage in public dialogue and debate regarding ethical and political issues related to religion.
  • Students can articulate their own thoughts clearly in critical discussion and in writing.
  • Students will appreciate the diverse accounts of wisdom and scripturally based moralities articulated by different religious traditions.

107.002

Instructor: Wolne, D.
Time/s: TR 1100-1215
Room: 

This course is designed to give an introduction to the basic beliefs, practices, and texts of some of the world’s major religions. The class will begin with an examination of Hinduism, and then move on to Buddhism, and then include a short section on Chinese religion & philosophy. After looking at these “Eastern” religions, we will examine the “Western” religious tradition, starting with Judaism, then looking at Christianity, and finally Islam.

107.003

Instructor: Candelaria, M.
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule

FLAT Fee: $100 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

Type: Lecture Delivery Mode: Online

Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

107.004

Instructor: Van Andel, K.
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

This course is an introduction to some of the world's major religions. The class will begin with a study of North American indigenous religions and then it will explore the “Eastern” religions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism.  The second half of the course will cover the “Western” or Abrahamic religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. By the end of the course, students will be able to describe the basic history, teachings, and practices of each religion covered.

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule

FLAT Fee: $100 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

Type: Lecture Delivery Mode: Online

Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

107.005

Instructor: Wolne, D.
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

2H (8 week-2nd half course)

This course is designed to give an introduction to the basic beliefs, practices, and texts of some of the world’s major religions. The class will begin with an examination of Hinduism, and then move on to Buddhism, and then include a short section on Chinese religion & philosophy. After looking at these “Eastern” religions, we will examine the “Western” religious tradition, starting with Judaism, then looking at Christianity, and finally Islam.

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule

FLAT Fee: $100 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

Type: Lecture Delivery Mode: Online

Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

230 - Hebrew Scriptures

230.001

Instructor: Todd, J
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

This course introduces the history of ancient Israel through the literature contained in the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament.  The examination places Israel as a religion, as a culture, and as a nation into the context of the Ancient Near East (ANE).  The literature of ancient Israel is explored along with the interactions with other cultures, and through comparative literature, sociology, and religions.

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule

FLAT Fee: $100 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

Type: Lecture Delivery Mode: Online

Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

232 - Christian Scriptures

232.001

Instructor: Yates, F
Time/s: TR 1400-1515
Room: 

This course studies the Christian Scriptures within the context of the world in which it arose. Through readings from the Christian Scriptures, and by reference to other early Christian literature, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Jewish and Greek sources, the course investigates who the first Christians were-what was distinctive about them and also what they had in common with other religious people of the time.

263 - Eastern Religions

Notes:

Student Learning Outcomes for B.A. in Religious Studies

  • Students can articulate how religious symbols and narratives are interpreted and mobilized to construct meaning in human life, by individuals and by communities – and how this changes over time or across different communities.
  • Students can engage in public dialogue and debate regarding ethical and political issues related to religion.
  • Students can articulate their own thoughts clearly in critical discussion and in writing.
  • Students will appreciate the diverse accounts of wisdom and scripturally based moralities articulated by different religious traditions.



263.002

Instructor: Gerber, L.
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

1H (8 week course-first half)

This class is a survey of the major religious traditions endogenous to Asia. Primarily, this includes Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Jainism, Sikhism, and Shinto. The history, major doctrines, rituals, important sacred texts, and contemporary developments of these traditions will be covered, giving the student an introduction to the religious cultures of India, China, & Japan.

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule

FLAT Fee: 100.00 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

Delivery Mode: Online

Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

263.004

Instructor: Shetiya, V.
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

A brief overview of Eastern Religions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism and Shinto.

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule

FLAT Fee: 100.00 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

Delivery Mode: Online

Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

264 - Western Religions

Notes:

Student Learning Outcomes for B.A. in Religious Studies

  • Students can articulate how religious symbols and narratives are interpreted and mobilized to construct meaning in human life, by individuals and by communities – and how this changes over time or across different communities.
  • Students can engage in public dialogue and debate regarding ethical and political issues related to religion.
  • Students can articulate their own thoughts clearly in critical discussion and in writing.
  • Students will appreciate the diverse accounts of wisdom and scripturally based moralities articulated by different religious traditions.

264.001

Instructor: Lipka, H.
Time/s: MWF 1000-1050
Room: MITCH 220

In this class we will focus on the three major religions of the western world: Judaism, Christianity and Islam, tracing the development of each of these religions from their origins up through modern times, and familiarizing ourselves with the major texts, movements, practices, and essential beliefs of each. By the end of this class, students should have a firm grasp of the origins, development, fundamental ideas, beliefs, rituals and practices of these three religions, and develop a sense of what each of these religions mean for the people who practice them and live by them.

264.002

Instructor: Gillett, T.
Time/s: MW 1630-1745
Room: 

264.003

Instructor: Ray, D
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

In this class we will study the three major religions of the Western world—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—tracing the development of these religions from their origins up through modern times, and familiarizing ourselves with the major texts, movements, beliefs, and practices of each.  The goal of the class is not only to establish a firm base of knowledge about these traditions, but also to develop a sense of what they mean for the people who live by them.

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule

FLAT Fee: $100 Ext Univ Online Course Fee

Type: Lecture Delivery Mode: Online

Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

314 - Islamic Mysticism

314.001

Instructor: Banihashemi, M.
Time/s: TR 1100-1215
Room: 

This course will introduce students to mystical dimensions of the Islamic religious tradition, commonly known as Sufism. The course will explore the nature, origins, and development of thoughts and practices of mystical Islam.  In this connection, various themes such as Sufism vis-à-vis Islamic orthodoxy, mystical experience of Sufis, internal and external forms of knowledge, the literary heritage of Sufism with an emphasis on Sufi poetry among many others will be reviewed.  The course will also examine Sufi organizations and social practices in the contemporary world.

X-LIST
SOC 398.013

326 - Islamic Fundamentalism

326.001

Instructor: Banihashemi, M.
Time/s: TR 1530-1645
Room: 

This course introduces students to the social, political, and cultural study of Islamic fundamentalism.  The content of the course is directed toward understanding the relation between socio/political life and fundamentalist trend in the Muslim world.  The course focuses on the cultural, historical, and political developments in Muslim societies that led to the resurgence and decline of fundamentalist trend in the contemporary Islamic world. In this connection, various themes such as modernity, tradition, fundamentalism, conservatism, orthodoxy and orthopraxy, and Islamic theory of state among many others will be discussed.  Furthermore, the course will comparatively address the Sunni and Shi’ite fundamentalism including recent developments in Iraq and Syria and the rise of ISIS, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

X-LIST
SOC 398.003

327 - History of Christianity 1517-Present

327.001

Instructor: Donna Ray
Time/s: TR 1100-1215
Room: 

This course covers the development of Christianity from the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century to the modern day.  Primary focus will be on the rich variety of forms—doctrinal, liturgical, artistic, intellectual, and institutional—that Christianity assumed throughout this period as it moved outward from Europe and became a world religion.  Also of concern will be the interaction of Christianity with society at large


X-LIST
HIST 327 001

343 - Catholic Saints in North America

343.001

Instructor: Holscher, K.
Time/s: TR 0930-1045
Room: 

Saints—men and women who, after their deaths, are celebrated as special and powerful intercessory agents-- have been a part of Christian devotional life for nearly two millennia. When Spanish and French Catholics arrived in the New World, they brought their devotions to saints with them. Over the centuries since then, Catholics of Indigenous, European, and African origins have developed their own devotions that, while informed by European tradition, are also marked by cultural patterns and hardships particular to life in North America. This course takes saints, and the transnational communities that have grown around them, as an entry point for exploring public and private histories of North American Catholicism. Our focus here is not the lives of saints, but rather their “afterlives”— the ways in which their memories have been constructed and reconstructed by lay Catholics, and the ways in which the Church has intervened to mediate those memories, by granting-- or in some cases refusing-- them official recognition. Saints shed light both on public histories of Catholicism—including the part the Church has played in European colonialism, and its relation to the  the ambitions of the U.S. nation-state—and they also speak to ways in which the divine becomes an intimate actor in people's lives.

X-LIST
HIST 300.021

347 - Topics in Religious Studies

347.001 - Latin American Thought

Instructor: Candelaria, M
Time/s: MWF 1300-1350
Room: 

X-LIST
PHIL 390.001
SOC 398.012
CCS 393.007

347.002 - Jewish Mysticism & Kabbalah

Instructor: Nutkiewicz, M
Time/s: TR 1530-1800
Room: 

1H (8 week course-1st half)

This course will consider the central ideas of the Jewish mystics from antiquity to contemporary manifestations. Great attention will be paid to the fundamental concepts of the “classical” period of kabbalah as formulated in the Zohar (13th C.), and the cosmology of Lurianic Kabbalah (16th C.). The course will also consider Christian Kabbalah during the Renaissance, and Hasidism, the popular mystical movement of the 18th C. that continues to the present.

X-LIST
PHIL 341 002

347.003 - Early Daoism

Instructor: Wolne, D.
Time/s: TR 0930-1045
Room: 

This course is designed to give an in-depth survey of the origins of one of the most important schools of Chinese religious and Philosophical thought: Daoism.  No prior knowledge of this tradition is required.  We will start by examining the ancient background and context of Daoism, as well as investigating the stories surrounding its’ legendary founder, Laozi.  For much of the term, we will be doing a close textual analysis of the Dao De Jing; the text traditionally attributed to Laozi.  After some preliminary investigations into the mechanics of textual interpretation, we will look at  some of the key themes of the Dao De Jing, such as ziran (naturalness), wu wei (unforced action), the virtue (or integrity) of the Daoist Sage, and Daoist political philosophy. Our vehicles for these excursions will be 2 important translations of the DDJ, by Robert Hendricks and Victor Mair.  Next, we will take some tentative steps in the direction of doing our own translations of short passages from the text (no previous knowledge of Chinese language required!), utilizing portions of a workbook designed by (the late) Dr. Ted Sturm, UNM Professor of Philosophy. Having canvassed the text in detail by this point, we will then examine the content of 2 early commentaries on the text, by Ho-Shang-Kung and Wang Bi.  We will finish the class by looking at the Zhuangzi (as well as the key commentary by Kuo Hsiang), another influential early Daoist text; one very different in style from the DDJ.

347.004 - Integr Ecol Cons & Soc Trans

Instructor: Banerjee, S.
Time/s: F 0900-1145
Room: 

X-LIST
ARTS 429.002
ARTS 529.002
NATV 450.005
GEOG 499.002
SUST 402.003
CRP 470.006
CRP 570.006
BIOL 402.025
BIOL 502.025
PADM 590.003
UHON 401.001
AMST 320.001
CJ 463.001

347.006 - Modern Occult & Contemporary Paganism

Instructor: Lipka, H
Time/s: T 1730-2000
Room: 

In this course we will discuss some of the major occult and pagan revival movements that have arisen in the past 200 years, including spiritualism, theosophy, Wicca, Goddess worship, and Heathenism, focusing on why these particular revival movements arose when and where they did, which figures were central in their revival, and how much of their practice is based on resumption of ancient beliefs and rituals, and how much is re-invention. We will trace the evolution of these movements over the last two centuries, and consider the forms that they have taken in contemporary society, and the influence that they have upon popular culture today.

347.007 - Magic in Ancient Religion

Instructor: Gorton, L
Time/s: TR 1400-1515
Room: 

X-LIST
CLST 334 001
ENGL 334 001
COMP 334.001

347.008 - Religion Radicalism Soc Chg

Instructor: Holscher, K.
Time/s: TR 1100-1215
Room: 

X-LIST
AMST 309.001

347.009 - Sex Gender in Ancient Religion

Instructor: Gorton, L
Time/s: MWF 1100-1215
Room: 

347.010 - Currandero Mex-Folk Healing

Instructor: Torres, E.
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

Mexican Folk Healing

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule
FLAT Fee: 100.00 Ext Univ Online Course Fee
Delivery Mode: Online
Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

X-LIST
LLSS 493.007
LLSS 593.008
LTAM 400.002
CCS 393.001

350 - Religion and Literature

350.001

Instructor: Van Andel, K
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

Religion and literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one’s place it in. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture still often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: “The Nature of the Divine,” “Self and Other,”and “Society and Culture,” the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature related to the three Abrahamic faiths−Judaism, Christianity, and Islam−and uses such to explore each unit’s themes. There are two exams, one short reflection assignment, and weekly reading quizzes and class discussion.

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule
FLAT Fee: 100.00 Ext Univ Online Course Fee
Delivery Mode: Online
Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

350.002

Instructor: VanAndel, K.
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

Religion and literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one’s place it in. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture still often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: “The Nature of the Divine,” “Self and Other,”and “Society and Culture,” the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature related to the three Abrahamic faiths−Judaism, Christianity, and Islam−and uses such to explore each unit’s themes. There are two exams, one short reflection assignment, and weekly reading quizzes and class discussion.

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule
FLAT Fee: 100.00 Ext Univ Online Course Fee
Delivery Mode: Online
Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

350.003

Instructor: VanAndel, K.
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

Religion and literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one’s place it in. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture still often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: “The Nature of the Divine,” “Self and Other,”and “Society and Culture,” the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature related to the three Abrahamic faiths−Judaism, Christianity, and Islam−and uses such to explore each unit’s themes. There are two exams, one short reflection assignment, and weekly reading quizzes and class discussion.

Online course visit: http://online.unm.edu/schedule
FLAT Fee: 100.00 Ext Univ Online Course Fee
Delivery Mode: Online
Taught at: EA-Online & ITV

447 - Seminar in Religious Studies

447.003 - Psychology of Religion

Instructor: Bridgers, L
Time/s: TR 1530-1645
Room: 

The 1909 conference at Clark University, organized by G. Stanley Hall, brought together three pivotal figures in the psychology of religion -- Sigmund Freud, C. G. Jung and William James.  This course begins with an overview of Gustav Fechner's work, the experimental psychologist who influenced all three figures.  It then explores the contributions of the seminal figures at the Clark conference - the psychology of religion as interpreted by Freud, Jung and James.  Shifting to contemporary understandings of religious experience we will examine more biologically based views, including Jerome Kagan's temperament studies, Judith Lewis Herman's traumatic studies, Lawrence Calhoun and Richard Tedeschi's posttraumatic growth, Victor Frankl's logotherapy, and Andrew Newberg's research in neurotheology.  It concludes with an exploration of the strengths and limitations that psychology brings to our understanding of religion and religious experience and the implications for clinical and pastoral practice.

X-LIST
PSY 450 026

452 - Theories of Religion

452.001

Instructor: Ray, D.
Time/s: R 1600-1830
Room: 


In this course we will examine and assess various modern theories of religion that address these questions: What is religion?  How is it to be explained?  Why has religion been such an enduring feature of human history and civilization? Why does religion affect individuals and societies so deeply? We will look at these theories alongside religions as they are understood by their adherents and lived on the ground.  Prerequisite: one course in Religious Studies.

453 - Asian Studies Thesis

453.001 - Asian Studies Thesis

Instructor: Brau, L
Time/s: Arranged
Room: 

Crosslisted: 47485-COMP 453 001
Crosslisted: 47487-HIST 453 001
Crosslisted: 47488-POLS 453 001
Crosslisted: 49125-PHIL 453 001
Type: Independent Study
IN-Instructor permission required

463 - The Theology of Paul

463.001 - The Theology of Paul

Instructor: Yates, F
Time/s: TR 1530-1645
Room: 

This course will study the theological contents of the letters of Paul set in the historical context of the developing
early Christian communities.  The focus of this course is Paul's letter to the Romans, which offers a key to the
thought of the apostle in all his letters.  Paul's views will be compared to the four Gospels as well as the other writers of the
Christian Scriptures.  Paul's theology will be set in the context of the Jewish and Greek thought in the first
century.

551 - M.A. Problems

551.001

Instructor: Bussanich, J
Time/s: Arranged
Room: