Skip to main content

Courses

Fall 2018

Survey of Bible in historical context.


103.001

Instructor: Candelaria, Michael
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Collaborative Teaching & Learn 130

  • Type: Lecture

Introduction to major living world religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (NMCCN 1113).


107.001

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel
Time/s: MWF 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM
Location: Woodward Lecture Hall 101

  • Type: Lecture

107.002

Instructor: ,

  • Canceled by department 5/09/2018.
  • Type: Lecture

107.003

Instructor: Candelaria, Michael
Online Class

107.006

Instructor: Candelaria, Michael
Online Class

107.008

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

107.009

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

107.010

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel
Online Class

Pentateuch and the historical books of the Old Testament. {Fall}


230.002

Instructor: Todd, Judith
Online Class

New Testament and early Christian history.


232.002

Instructor: ,

  • Canceled by department 8/17/2018.
  • Type: Lecture

A study of major Asian traditions, such as Taoism, Hinduism and Buddhism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (NMCCN 1213). {Fall}


263.001

Instructor: Gerber, Lisa
Online Class

263.003

Instructor: Shetiya, Vibha
Online Class

263.004

Instructor: Gerber, Lisa
Online Class

A study of major Western traditions, such as Christianity, Islam and Judaism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (NMCCN 1223). {Spring}


264.001

Instructor: Lipka, Hilary
Time/s: MWF 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 226

  • Type: Lecture

264.003

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Online Class

(Also offered as AFST 303) Students will be introduced to the Black experience, which necessitates the redefinition of God and Jesus Christ in the lives of Black people as the struggle for transcendental and political freedom.


303.001

Instructor: ,

  • Canceled by department 7/03/2018.
  • Type: Lecture

An introduction to the origin and development of mystical aspects of Islam, commonly known as Sufism. The course examines themes such as Sufism vis-à-vis Islamic orthodoxy, mystical experience, the literary heritage of Sufism, Sufi organizations.


314.001

Instructor: Banihashemi, Mozafar
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: R.O. Anderson Grad Sch of Mgmt 128

  • Type: Lecture

(Also offered as HIST 326/526) The history of Christianity from its beginnings in Palestine to the eve of the Protestant Reformation. Primary focus will be on the rich variety of forms-doctrinal, liturgical and institutional-that Christianity assumed through the Medieval centuries. Also of concern will be its contributions and significance as a civilizing force. {Fall}


326.001

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 102

  • Type: Lecture

Studies in major religious figures or movements. Topic varies.


347.001 T: Apocalypse in the Anct Wrld

Instructor: Gorton, Luke
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 229

Apocalypse is a fascinating genre which is famous for its strange images, cryptic messages, and predictions of future events. In Apocalypse in the Ancient World, we will examine the development of the genre of apocalypse, starting in Second Temple Judaism and moving on into early Christianity. After discussing the cultural and literary topoi of the apocalypse, we will read a number of apocalypses, including the two included in the Bible (Daniel and Revelation) as well as other well-known apocalypses such as the Book of Enoch. We will study the symbolism, message, and meaning of each to ascertain what they meant to their original readers and what they might mean today. After tracing the development of the genre through early Christianity, we will conclude the course by examining the ongoing legacy of apocalypticism in our world today.
  • Type: Topics

347.002 T: Atheism: Trends & Critiques

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel
Time/s: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Location: Mitchell Hall 214

This class is designed to survey some classical and contemporary currents in Atheism.  We will start by looking at different definitions of and types of Atheism, as well as current demographic and psychological profiles of atheists.  Then, we will look at some of the key atheistic critiques of arguments for  the existence of God, including critical discussions (with theistic responses) of the Argument from Design and the Ontological Argument.  We will also investigate a few influential atheistic explanations of religious belief, and evaluate the merits and demerits of those approaches.  Although the course will be primarily concerned with atheistic critiques of the Western monotheistic traditions, a few brief forays into some non-Western traditions will be included.
  • Type: Topics

347.003 T: Buddhist Philosophy

Instructor: Harter, Pierre-Julien
Time/s: MWF 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Location: Collaborative Teaching & Learn 230

  • Type: Topics

347.004 T: Biblical Law

Instructor: Lipka, Hilary
Time/s: MWF 12:00 PM - 12:50 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 126

In this class we will engage in a detailed study of biblical law, familiarizing ourselves with each of the biblical legal collections and considering what their significance was within their original context and how they related to actual legal practice in ancient Israel. We will also discuss how Jesus and Paul viewed biblical law and why they viewed it that way, the influence that biblical law has had in shaping contemporary U.S. law, and the role it has played in recent debates about issues such as immigration reform, gay marriage, and the death penalty.
  • Type: Topics

347.005 T: Introduction to Buddhism

Instructor: Ulrich, Katherine
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Education 204

This class is a historical survey of Buddhist practices, beliefs, institutions, and figures from the time of the historical Buddha through to the contemporary period. Approximately half the semester will focus on early and Theravada Buddhism through a close study of Buddhist scriptures from the Pali Canon and an examination of archaeological evidence from early India; the rest of the semester briefly considers Mahayana (Zen and Pure Land), followed by an in-depth examination of an ethnography of a Tibetan Buddhist community in Nepal. Readings include both primary sources in translation and scholarly literature; classes are a combination of powerpoint lectures and discussion, with the occasional film.
  • Type: Topics

347.006 T: (Non) Violence and Religion

Instructor: ,

Religions are justly famed for the value their adherents have placed on the concept of nonviolence and peace. Yet throughout history, they have just as often praised violence in the form of individual acts of sacrifice or martyrdom or collective wars or riots targeting members of other religions. This class explores the relationship between violence and nonviolence in scriptures, rituals, and ethical thought. Approximately two-thirds of the semester will focus on religions of Asia (Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Islam), with comparative interludes drawn from sources including ancient Greek, early Christian, and contemporary American religious traditions. 
  • Canceled by department 8/17/2018.
  • Type: Topics

347.007 T: Pol Islam Past & Present

Instructor: Banihashemi, Mozafar
Time/s: TR 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 227

  • Type: Topics

347.008 T: Religion & Gender in the US

Instructor: Bridgers, Lynn
Time/s: TR 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 126

This course has three interrelated foci to study the impact of gender on religious beliefs and practices in the context of the contemporary United States, to explore the influence and effect of feminism, women’s studies and gender studies in the academic study of religion, and to assess current gender issues within diverse religious traditions. Readings include both descriptive analytical studies by scholars of religion and theoretical, constructive work by religious thinkers and theologians. Attention is given to both fundamentalist constructions of gender and resistance to gender norms within religious traditions. Traditions explored include Christianity, Judaism, Islam and Native American belief systems.
  • Type: Topics

347.009 T: Postmodernism and Religion

Instructor: ,

This course examines important postmodernist texts to gain a fundamental grasp of the of the different styles, concepts, and arguments of the various types of postmodernism. Our readings from come from a rich variety of postmodernists:Lyotard, Jameson, Vattimo, Hassan, Baudrillard, Foucault, Jencks, Laclau, Gorz, Habermas, Nancy Frazer and Linda Nicholson. We will explore the differences between modernism and postmodernism in general. We will study the different attitudes and approaches of modernists and postmodernist to religion. We will consider the future of religion in a postmodernist era.
  • Canceled by department 8/22/2018.
  • Type: Topics

347.010 T: Curanderismo Part 1

Instructor: Torres, Eliseo
Online Class

347.011 T: Celluloid Buddhas

Instructor: Dever, Susan
Time/s: F 11:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Location: Cons for Env Rsrch, Info & Art 365

  • Type: Topics

347.012 T: Mormons & American Identity

Instructor: ,

  • Canceled by department 8/29/2018.
  • Type: Topics

An introduction exploring relationships between the literary and religious traditions. {Fall}


350.001

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

350.002

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

(Also offered as HIST 441) This class will cover the rise and development of the nation's religious groups, from first contact to the present day. The focus will be on the social impact of the groups and how they influenced the development of American life.


441.001

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Time/s: TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 221

  • Type: Seminar

(Also offered as COMP, HIST, PHIL, POLS 453) Supervised research in one or more disciplines leading to an undergraduate thesis for the major in Asian Studies.


453.001

Instructor: Brau, Lorna
Location:

  • Type: Independent Study

Topics in the literary and historical analysis of Biblical texts. Prerequisite: 230 or 231 or 232.


463.001 Sem: Theology of Paul

Instructor: ,

The course will study the theological contents of the letters of Paul against the background of the developing early Christian communities. The writings of Paul include some of the most important documents of the Christian tradition. The focus of this course will be on the Letter to the Romans, which offers a key to the overall thought of the apostle. Our main text (Dunn) will give us an up-to-date survey ofcurrent interpretations of Paul’s thinking as it follows the structure of Romans. The Conzelmann and Lindemann text provides us needed historical background information. The Sanders text offers us a concise introduction to Paul.

  • Canceled by department 8/17/2018.
  • Type: Seminar

Restriction: permission of program chairperson.


497.001

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel

  • Type: Seminar

497.002

Instructor: Bussanich, John

  • Type: Seminar

497.003

Instructor: Gerber, Lisa
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.004

Instructor: Banihashemi, Mozafar
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.005

Instructor: Yates, Franklin
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.006

Instructor: Gorton, Luke
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.008

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.009

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.010

Instructor: Bridgers, Lynn
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.011

Instructor: Lipka, Hilary
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

Spring 2019

Introduction to major living world religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (NMCCN 1113).


107.001

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Woodward Lecture Hall 101

This course is designed to give an introduction to the basic beliefs, practices, and texts of some of the world’s major religions. The class will begin with an examination of Hinduism, and then move on to Buddhism, and then include a short section on Chinese religion & philosophy. After looking at these “Eastern” religions, we will examine the “Western” religious tradition, starting with Judaism, then looking at Christianity, and finally Islam.

  • Type: Lecture

107.002

Instructor: Candelaria, Michael
Time/s: MWF 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 328

This course is designed to give an introduction to the basic beliefs, practices, and texts of some of the world’s major religions. The class will begin with an examination of Hinduism, and then move on to Buddhism, and then include a short section on Chinese religion & philosophy. After looking at these “Eastern” religions, we will examine the “Western” religious tradition, starting with Judaism, then looking at Christianity, and finally Islam.

  • Type: Lecture

107.004

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

This course is an introduction to some of the world's major religions. The class will begin with a study of North American indigenous religions and then it will explore the “Eastern” religions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism.  The second half of the course will cover the “Western” or Abrahamic religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. By the end of the course, students will be able to describe the basic history, teachings, and practices of each religion covered.

107.005

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

107.006

Instructor: Candelaria, Michael
Online Class

This course is an introduction to the academic study of religion, focusing on Hinduism, Buddhism, the Chinese Religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Attention will also be given to oral/indigenous religions and the theories of religion.

 

Pentateuch and the historical books of the Old Testament. {Fall}


230.001

Instructor: Todd, Judith
Online Class

This course introduces the history of ancient Israel through the literature contained in the Hebrew Bible, or Old Testament.  The examination places Israel as a religion, as a culture, and as a nation into the context of the Ancient Near East (ANE).  The literature of ancient Israel is explored along with the interactions with other cultures, and through comparative literature, sociology, and religions.

New Testament and early Christian history.


232.001

Instructor: Yates, Franklin
Time/s: TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 334

  • Type: Lecture

A study of major Asian traditions, such as Taoism, Hinduism and Buddhism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (NMCCN 1213). {Fall}


263.001

Instructor: Ulrich, Katherine
Time/s: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 128

Eastern Religions is a thematic introduction to the religions of India, China, Tibet, and Japan and their study in the context of a nonsectarian learning curriculum. Each week we will explore one of Asia’s major indigenous religious traditions and the beliefs and practices of its adherents while examining two broad themes. The first is illness and death: we will explore how beliefs about human bodies, souls, and the afterlife shape medical decisions and funerary practices. The second broad theme for the course is that of pilgrimage and sacred space. How do religious beliefs and practices shape people’s understandings of and interactions with the environment around them? Why do people go on pilgrimage, and what impact do such journeys have on both the people and the places? Religious traditions covered include Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, and the folk, popular, or new religions of India, China, Tibet, and Japan. Classes consist of a combination of powerpoint lectures, films, and the occasional group exercise.

  • Type: Lecture

263.002

Instructor: Gerber, Lisa
Online Class

263.003

Instructor: Gerber, Lisa
Online Class

A study of major Western traditions, such as Christianity, Islam and Judaism. Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts (NMCCN 1223). {Spring}


264.001

Instructor: Lipka, Hilary
Time/s: MWF 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM
Location: Mitchell Hall 220

H. Lipka

In this class we will focus on the three major religions of the western world: Judaism, Christianity and Islam, tracing the development of each of these religions from their origins up through modern times, and familiarizing ourselves with the major texts, movements, practices, and essential beliefs of each. By the end of this class, students should have a firm grasp of the origins, development, fundamental ideas, beliefs, rituals and practices of these three religions, and develop a sense of what each of these religions mean for the people who practice them and live by them.

  • Type: Lecture

264.003

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Online Class

D. Ray

In this class we will study the three major religions of the Western world—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—tracing the development of these religions from their origins up through modern times, and familiarizing ourselves with the major texts, movements, beliefs, and practices of each.  The goal of the class is not only to establish a firm base of knowledge about these traditions, but also to develop a sense of what they mean for the people who live by them.

An introduction to Jewish religion and thought that explores the worldview of rabbinic Judaism, including law, philosophy, and mysticism from the 1st to the 20th centuries.


310.001

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel
Time/s: TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 218

  • Type: Lecture

An examination of the social, political, and cultural aspects of fundamentalism in the contemporary Muslim world.


313.001

Instructor: Banihashemi, Mozafar
Time/s: TR 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 126

 Banihashemi

This course introduces students to the social, political, and cultural study of Islamic fundamentalism. The content of the course is directed toward understanding the relation between socio/political life and fundamentalist trend in the Muslim world. The course focuses on the cultural, historical, and political developments in Muslim societies that led to the resurgence and decline of fundamentalist trend in the contemporary Islamic world. In this connection, various themes such as modernity, tradition, fundamentalism, conservatism, orthodoxy and orthopraxy, and Islamic theory of state among many others will be discussed. Furthermore, the course will comparatively address the Sunni and Shi’ite fundamentalism including recent developments in Iraq and Syria and the rise of ISIS, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

  • Type: Lecture

An introduction to the origin and development of mystical aspects of Islam, commonly known as Sufism. The course examines themes such as Sufism vis-à-vis Islamic orthodoxy, mystical experience, the literary heritage of Sufism, Sufi organizations.


314.001

Instructor: Banihashemi, Mozafar
Time/s: TR 12:30 PM - 1:45 PM
Location: Ortega Hall 241

Banihashemi

This course will introduce students to mystical dimensions of the Islamic religious tradition, commonly known as Sufism. The course will explore the nature, origins, and development of thoughts and practices of mystical Islam.  In this connection, various themes such as Sufism vis-à-vis Islamic orthodoxy, mystical experience of Sufis, internal and external forms of knowledge, the literary heritage of Sufism with an emphasis on Sufi poetry among many others will be reviewed.  The course will also examine Sufi organizations and social practices in the contemporary world.

  • Type: Lecture

(Also offered as HIST 327/527) The development of Christianity from the Protestant Reformation to the modern day, with focus on the variety of forms Christianity assumed throughout this period as it moved outward from Europe and became a world religion.


327.001

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Time/s: MWF 1:00 PM - 1:50 PM
Location: Education 101

  • Type: Lecture

This course examines Hindu scriptures and practices to understand how deities and their relationships with men and women, high and low castes, and the natural and social worlds have changed over time.


335.001

Instructor: Ulrich, Katherine
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 128

  • Type: Lecture

Studies in major religious figures or movements. Topic varies.


347.001 T: Gospel According to Losers

Instructor: ,

T: Goddesses & Gods of India

K. Ulrich

This course is an introduction to the goddesses and gods of India and explores three questions: 1. Who are the goddesses and gods of India? 2. What are their relationships with each other, male and female human beings, the natural world, and their social and religious contexts? 3. What difference, if any, does the gender of a deity make (e.g., to their relationship with worshipers or to the social structure of the society worshiping them)?

In the course of exploring these questions, we will familiarize ourselves with many local, regional, and pan-Indian gods and goddesses, along with their art/iconography, rituals, philosophy, history, and literature (both Sanskrit and popular). While the focus will be on Hindu goddesses and gods, we will also briefly consider non-Hindu (e.g., Christian, Muslim) saints, who often resemble or act like Hindu deities. Materials for this course are drawn from textual, historical, and ethnographic studies from the various regions of India and the Indian diaspora; classes will be a combination of discussion, powerpoint lectures, and films

  • Canceled by department 11/05/2018.
  • Type: Topics

347.002 T: New Religious Movmnts in Am

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Time/s: TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 208

 T: New Religions

 
Throughout its history, America has been fertile soil for religious innovation.  From Native American renewalist movements to Mormons, Rastafarians, Scientologists, and New Age groups, many entrepreneurial religious organizations have emerged and found success in the last two hundred years.  In this course, we will examine, compare, and seek to understand these new religious movements in broader religious and historical context.
  • Type: Topics

347.003 T: Mod Occult&Contemp Paganism

Instructor: Lipka, Hilary
Time/s: T 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
Location: Dane Smith Hall 229

  • Type: Topics

347.004 T: Sex & Gender Anc Religion

Instructor: Gorton, Luke
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 122

  • Type: Topics

347.007 T: Magic in Ancient Religion

Instructor: Gorton, Luke
Time/s: TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 122

L. Gorton

This course will examine the reality and the imagination of magic in the ancient world, focusing primarily on the cultures of Greece and Rome but with reference to Jewish and early Christian thought as well. Ancient magic manifested itself in a variety of ritual acts which were described, explained, and caricatured in a fairly large number of texts written in antiquity, and it is by reading these texts that we will come to an understanding of magic in the ancient world. Two questions which will permeate the course are as follows: What is magic? How does ancient magic differ from ancient religion? To answer these questions, we will begin with a brief overview of ancient religion (again, primarily Greco-Roman but with reference to ancient Judaism and Christianity) before continuing on to a full discussion of ancient magic. The very term “magic” originated in ancient Greece, and so we will have occasion to discuss both the terminology and practice of magic in the ancient world.

  • Type: Topics

347.010 T: Curanderismo Part 2

Instructor: Torres, Eliseo
Online Class

An introduction exploring relationships between the literary and religious traditions. {Fall}


350.001

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

K. Van Andel

Religion and literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one’s place it in. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture still often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: “The Nature of the Divine,” “Self and Other,”and “Society and Culture,” the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature related to the three Abrahamic faiths−Judaism, Christianity, and Islam−and uses such to explore each unit’s themes. There are two exams, one short reflection assignment, and weekly reading quizzes and class discussion.

  • Online course visit: http//online.unm.edu/schedule
  • Type: Lecture
  • Fee: $100

350.002

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Online Class

Religion and literature and the myths and stories that define them arguably serve as the foundation of culture. Long before the development of academic disciplines and critical thought, the practice of contemplating and explaining the self and the universe through narrative and poetry proved essential for understanding the world and one’s place it in. Today, although we work and think with highly sophisticated thought patterns within specialized academic disciplines, the key to understanding ourselves and culture still often lies in story. This course on religion and literature builds on this truth. Through three units entitled: “The Nature of the Divine,” “Self and Other,”and “Society and Culture,” the course discusses how the act and art of story telling not only helps us understand the past but also the present construction of the world. The course material focuses on the literature related to the three Abrahamic faiths−Judaism, Christianity, and Islam−and uses such to explore each unit’s themes. There are two exams, one short reflection assignment, and weekly reading quizzes and class discussion.

Major religious figures or movements. Topic varies. Prerequisite: one Religious Studies course.


447.001 Sem: Evolution of Religiosity

Instructor: Watson, Paul
Time/s: TR 11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Location: Castetter Hall (Biology) 107

  • Type: Seminar

447.003 Sem: Psychology of Religion

Instructor: ,

L. Bridgers

The 1909 conference at Clark University, organized by G. Stanley Hall, brought together three pivotal figures in the psychology of religion -- Sigmund Freud, C. G. Jung and William James.  This course begins with an overview of Gustav Fechner's work, the experimental psychologist who influenced all three figures.  It then explores the contributions of the seminal figures at the Clark conference - the psychology of religion as interpreted by Freud, Jung and James.  Shifting to contemporary understandings of religious experience we will examine more biologically based views, including Jerome Kagan's temperament studies, Judith Lewis Herman's traumatic studies, Lawrence Calhoun and Richard Tedeschi's posttraumatic growth, Victor Frankl's logotherapy, and Andrew Newberg's research in neurotheology.  It concludes with an exploration of the strengths and limitations that psychology brings to our understanding of religion and religious experience and the implications for clinical and pastoral practice.

  • Type: Seminar

(Also offered as ITAL *475) Principally the Vita Nuova and the Divine Comedy.


475.001

Instructor: Duke, Rachele
Time/s: TR 2:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Mitchell Hall 117

  • Type: Seminar

Restriction: permission of program chairperson.


497.001

Instructor: Bussanich, John

  • Type: Seminar

497.002

Instructor: Wolne, Daniel

  • Type: Seminar

497.003

Instructor: Yates, Franklin
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.004

Instructor: Gerber, Lisa
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.005

Instructor: Holscher, Kathleen
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.006

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.007

Instructor: Bridgers, Lynn
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.008

Instructor: Van Andel, Kelly
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.009

Instructor: Gorton, Luke
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.010

Instructor: Banihashemi, Mozafar
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.011

Instructor: Ray, Donna
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

497.012

Instructor: Lipka, Hilary
Location:

  • Type: Seminar

Tutorial arrangement with a member of the graduate faculty.


551.001

Instructor: ,

  • Type: Lecture

551.002

Instructor: Todd, Judith
Location:

  • Type: Lecture